Winds Causing Some Problems for Cherry Growers

 

Eugene buenaventura
"over the last week and a half, we've had rain, sunshine, cold nights, and high winds. That may just seem like mother nature to you, but to local growers, it can be a problem for their cherries."
Cherry harvest is in full swing. About 20 million boxes are expected to be packed from the northwest and shipped across the world.
 The recent winds have been the biggest concern for growers like john thompson.
John thompson
Grower
"when the wind blows, the cherries are banging against each other, and that creates a bruise on them. When that gets to the market, that's a brown spot."
Thompson says the rain and hot days are nothing compared to the frost and burn from last year, but wind gusts of 30 miles per hour for weeks on end has made some of his work harder -- especially when it comes to protecting the fruit against pests.
John thompson
Grower
"if the wind's blowing, we can't spray, because we're just pushing it up three feet off the sprayer and we're not getting the tops of the trees."
Today saw a more mild breeze, thompson says he doesn't expect his cherries to take anymore damage from the elements -- which is good for his u-pick event, starting tomorrow..
John thompson
Grower
"the price is up, we've got good sizes, it's good quality fruit. But next year we may not be so lucky.
Eugene buenaventura
"thompson says he expects several hundred people to visit his farm over the next few weekends. 95% of those people will be from the seattle area. In naches, eugene buenaventura, your local abc."

Over the last week and a half, we've had rain, sunshine, cold nights, and high winds.

That may just seem like mother nature to you, but to local growers, it can be a problem for their cherries.

Cherry harvest is in full swing.

About 20 million boxes are expected to be packed from the Northwest and shipped across the world. 

The recent winds have been the biggest concern for growers like John Thompson.

"When the wind blows, the cherries are banging against each other, and that creates a bruise on them," said Thompson, "When that gets to the market, that's a brown spot."

Thompson says the rain and hot days are nothing compared to the frost and burn from last year, but wind gusts of 30 miles per hour for weeks on end has made some of his work harder -- especially when it comes to protecting the fruit against pests.

"If the wind's blowing, we can't spray, because we're just pushing it up three feet off the sprayer and we're not getting the tops of the trees," said Thompson.

Today saw a more mild breeze, Thompson says he doesn't expect his cherries to take anymore damage from the elements -- which is good for his u-pick event, starting tomorrow.

"The price is up, we've got good sizes, it's good quality fruit. But next year we may not be so lucky."