Murder Victim's Father Starting Youth Outreach Program

<p>Cushions</p>

Cushions

It's a situation most of us could never comprehend, losing a child to a random act of violence.

That's what happened to Chris Snapp last summer, when his 17-year-old son Joshua Snapp was shot and killed on July 4th.

"People say that you never get over the loss of a child and you can use that energy in a destructive manor or you can use that energy to really build something great," said Snapp.

Snapp has decided to start a non-profit called "Cushions," a community youth outreach program here in the Tri-Cities aimed at giving troubled teens better opportunity in life.

He said it may have even helped Joshua.

"We're not going to get evey kid out there that's heading in the wrong direction, if we get one that's a success," said Snapp. "I think Josh would have definitely enjoyed being a part of something like this. He always liked helping people."

The organization is in its very early stages and one of the first steps is fundraising.

Snapp started a Go Fund Me website, called "Cushions Start Up Funds" and so far has raised nearly $700.

He wants kids to have a place to do art work, garden, play music, dance and much more.

He also hopes to have a 12-step program to help those struggling with addiction.

Local members of the community have already reached out to Snapp offering support and resources to make it all happen.

Snapp hopes to raise enough money to find the perfect location where young people can join together to build something of their own.

He hopes that the kids can reach out and bring in their peers who are caught up in a bad lifestyle and turn it into something positive in hopes they'll never end up like his son, the teen who killed his son and the other teen accused of killing his son.

One teenager, Josh Hunt, has been convicted of the killing, with another, John Young, still to stand trial.

"With the unfortunate things that have happened in my life, I really have a strong desire at this point in time to help the teens out there that have found themselves in similar situations as these three boys have," said Snapp.