Seattle Vigil to Protest Teen's Death

 

   SEATTLE (AP) -- Dozens of people gathered in downtown Seattle to peacefully protest the death of a black teen shot by a police officer in Missouri.
   Similar protest vigils in more than 90 cities across the country drew thousands of people Thursday.
   Many who gathered at the hour-long vigil at Seattle's Westlake Mall held signs with messages that included "Unite Against Racism," and "Solidarity With Ferguson."
   The vigils came in the wake of Saturday's fatal shooting of 18-year-old Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri.
   Among those who participated in Seattle was Rick Williams, brother of Seattle woodcarver John T. Williams, who was shot and killed by a Seattle officer in 2010. In late 2011, the U.S. Justice Department found Seattle officers were too quick to use force, even in situations that could have been defused verbally.
   The department has been working to change under a settlement with federal authorities. New Police Chief Kathleen O'Toole has said her priorities include restoring public trust and department pride.

   SEATTLE (AP) -- Dozens of people gathered in downtown Seattle to peacefully protest the death of a black teen shot by a police officer in Missouri.   Similar protest vigils in more than 90 cities across the country drew thousands of people Thursday.   Many who gathered at the hour-long vigil at Seattle's Westlake Mall held signs with messages that included "Unite Against Racism," and "Solidarity With Ferguson."   The vigils came in the wake of Saturday's fatal shooting of 18-year-old Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri.   Among those who participated in Seattle was Rick Williams, brother of Seattle woodcarver John T. Williams, who was shot and killed by a Seattle officer in 2010. In late 2011, the U.S. Justice Department found Seattle officers were too quick to use force, even in situations that could have been defused verbally.   The department has been working to change under a settlement with federal authorities. New Police Chief Kathleen O'Toole has said her priorities include restoring public trust and department pride.